Ancient Egypt and the Ancient Near East, mythology, goddesses, monsters, etc.

I am only a lay student in these areas, so take what I say with a grain of salt!

My goal is to accurately label every post: please tell me if you see something that's not correctly attributed, tagged, or captioned.

I am also ikhet-sekhmet.livejournal.com.

 

Edwin Long, Anno Domini (detail), 1883. More of the drama of the infant at death’s door. At right, you can see the holy family’s donkey entering the frame.

Edwin Long, Anno Domini (detail), 1883. More of the drama of the infant at death’s door. At right, you can see the holy family’s donkey entering the frame.

(Source: flickr.com)

Edwin Long, Anno Domini (detail), 1883. (via Martin Beek on Flickr)

Beautiful closeup of the attempted revival of a sick or dead infant with the help of a statuette of a god. (The artist’s message isn’t too tricky to figure out.)

Edwin Long, Anno Domini (detail), 1883. (via Martin Beek on Flickr)

Beautiful closeup of the attempted revival of a sick or dead infant with the help of a statuette of a god. (The artist’s message isn’t too tricky to figure out.)

Nebuchadnezzar’s Denigration, an illustration by Georges Rochegrosse of the Babylonian king’s madness as portrayed in Daniel 4. I’ve put this picture through the simplest of touch-ups in Photoshop Elements, but what I really wish I could do is find a much bigger version of the image, so that we could see those faces more clearly - the emperor, delightedly rooting in filth; the angel, stern and satified (with Mesopotamian-style double wings); that wonderful portly courtier with raised eyebrows, holding the crown (and perhaps wondering if it might be available).

Nebuchadnezzar’s Denigration, an illustration by Georges Rochegrosse of the Babylonian king’s madness as portrayed in Daniel 4. I’ve put this picture through the simplest of touch-ups in Photoshop Elements, but what I really wish I could do is find a much bigger version of the image, so that we could see those faces more clearly - the emperor, delightedly rooting in filth; the angel, stern and satified (with Mesopotamian-style double wings); that wonderful portly courtier with raised eyebrows, holding the crown (and perhaps wondering if it might be available).

" ‘Revelation - Its Grand Climax at hand!’ Watch Tower, 1988. Illustrator unknown."

I was glad to find the original version of this image (and a source to boot!) - usually the text has been removed and replaced with whichever conspiracy theory the user favours.

" ‘Revelation - Its Grand Climax at hand!’ Watch Tower, 1988. Illustrator unknown."

I was glad to find the original version of this image (and a source to boot!) - usually the text has been removed and replaced with whichever conspiracy theory the user favours.

The Writing on the Wall - another illustration from The Standard Bible Story Reader.

The Writing on the Wall - another illustration from The Standard Bible Story Reader.

The Flight to Egypt from the Standard Bible Story Reader. The Holy Family are jolly lucky it wasn’t a Boat to Australia.
The Flight to Egypt from the Standard Bible Story Reader. The Holy Family are jolly lucky it wasn’t a Boat to Australia.

(Source: bibleclipart.blogspot.com.au)

demonagerie:

British Library,  Add MS 11695, detail of f. 147v.  Beatus of Liébana, Commentary on the Apocalypse. 1091-1109

demonagerie:

British Library, Add MS 11695, detail of f. 147v. Beatus of Liébana, Commentary on the Apocalypse. 1091-1109

demonagerie:

Lausanne, Bibliothèque Cantonale et Universitaire, U 964, detail of f. 480v (woman clothed with the sun, dragon with seven heads). Biblia Porta. Franco-Flemish, end of the 13th century.

demonagerie:

Lausanne, Bibliothèque Cantonale et Universitaire, U 964, detail of f. 480v (woman clothed with the sun, dragon with seven heads). Biblia Porta. Franco-Flemish, end of the 13th century.

I’ll bet God’s Little Princesses has Esther, though - she, too, saves the day through her courage and wits, but less sex and violence is involved. :) Here she is risking death by approaching the king without being summoned first.

I’ll bet God’s Little Princesses has Esther, though - she, too, saves the day through her courage and wits, but less sex and violence is involved. :) Here she is risking death by approaching the king without being summoned first.