Ancient Egypt and the Ancient Near East, mythology, goddesses, monsters, etc.

I am only a lay student in these areas, so take what I say with a grain of salt!

I am also ikhet-sekhmet.livejournal.com. My reverse harem can be found at aegyopoisoned.tumblr.com.

 

carcat:

our biology teacher brought a skeleton to class yesterday and now everyone’s treating it as if it’s a part if our class i’m going to

This is how I hope to go out. Found in the library, completely “deady-bones”, as my brothers and I used to say as infants.

carcat:

our biology teacher brought a skeleton to class yesterday and now everyone’s treating it as if it’s a part if our class i’m going to

This is how I hope to go out. Found in the library, completely “deady-bones”, as my brothers and I used to say as infants.

(Source: ayatokiwa)

nekhen-ptah:

“Fragmentary pair statue of Ptah and Herishef,” [Yale University Art Gallery Bulletin] by John Coleman Darnell and Colleen Manassa concludes:

A likely origin for the dyad of Ptah and Herishef is the temple “Neb-maat-re (Amenhotep III)- United-with-Ptah,” an extensive temple complex in Memphis, whose primary deity was the deified Amenhotep III as Ptah

nekhen-ptah:

“Fragmentary pair statue of Ptah and Herishef,” [Yale University Art Gallery Bulletin] by John Coleman Darnell and Colleen Manassa concludes:

A likely origin for the dyad of Ptah and Herishef is the temple “Neb-maat-re (Amenhotep III)- United-with-Ptah,” an extensive temple complex in Memphis, whose primary deity was the deified Amenhotep III as Ptah

In a drawing from his tomb, Tuthmose III is suckled by the goddess Isis in the form of a tree. “To the modern eye,” says William H. Peck in Egyptian Drawings, “the image of a tree which has sprouted arms and a breast is difficult to understand. For the ancient Egyptian it was the most direct manner of suggesting the relationship between the king and the mother goddess.”

In a drawing from his tomb, Tuthmose III is suckled by the goddess Isis in the form of a tree. “To the modern eye,” says William H. Peck in Egyptian Drawings, “the image of a tree which has sprouted arms and a breast is difficult to understand. For the ancient Egyptian it was the most direct manner of suggesting the relationship between the king and the mother goddess.”

I’ve gotta get my hands on the recent Journal of Egyptian Archaeology article about hair and hairstyles found attached to unmummified skeletons from Amarna. Lots of braids, lots of extensions (but no wigs). “…the people who lived in the ancient city had a wide variety of hair types. They range ‘from very curly black hair, to middle brown straight,’  something ‘that might reflect a degree of ethnic variation.’” Intriguing!

(Source: livescience.com)

A manticore from a 16th Century manuscript held at the Biblioteca Nazionale Marciana in Venice.

A manticore from a 16th Century manuscript held at the Biblioteca Nazionale Marciana in Venice.

(Source: flickr.com)

"Cartouche name of Nebra in the Abydos King List (cartouche no. 10)"

"Cartouche name of Nebra in the Abydos King List (cartouche no. 10)"

(Source: Wikipedia)

The word ṯȜy, meaning “male/masculine,” ends with the image of an erect, often ejaculating penis, making clear that the condition of being male in ancient Egypt was linked to the erect phallus.

Gay Robins, “Male Bodies and the Construction of Masculinity in New Kingdom Egyptian Art”

Proof that men have always been bizzarely in love with their penises—when no one else is—for thousands and thousands of years. Men are pitiful, and they always have been.

(via omnia-est-vanitas)

It’s a shame to reduce Robins’ discussion to this one introductory sentence. All but one page of the chapter is available on Google Books, and it’s well worth a look. (For example, why are the penises of kings hidden in art, while gods’ are impressively erect?)

But what really puzzles me is what determinative for the word “male” would be more appropriate than a cock and balls. A more interesting question, perhaps, is why there’s no corresponding hieroglyph depicting the female genitals. (There is a breast, though.) My guess is that it’s because, like so many languages, male is the default in Egyptian - so just using the determinative of a man isn’t going to be clear enough, whereas if you put the seated woman hieroglyph at the end the meaning will be unmistakeable.

Richard Wilkinson. I’ll bet this was an illustration for New Scientist.

Richard Wilkinson. I’ll bet this was an illustration for New Scientist.

Female pilots from Return of the Jedi. Only the topmost character appeared in the movie, her single line dubbed (presumably by mistake) by a male voice actor. Footage of the top and middle characters is available on the Blu-Ray release.

(Source: starwarsaficionado.blogspot.com.au)

ancientpeoples:

Faience amulet in shape of a frog 
It is 1.2cm long, 1.1cm wide and only 1cm high ( 1/2 x 7/16 x 3/8 inch,). The frog is an egyptian symbol for new life, that is why it was a very popular symbol and amulet. 
Egyptian, New Kingdom, 18th dynasty, reign of Amenhotep III, 1390 - 1352 BC. 
Source: Metropolitan Museum

You cannot know how much I want to eat this.

ancientpeoples:

Faience amulet in shape of a frog 

It is 1.2cm long, 1.1cm wide and only 1cm high ( 1/2 x 7/16 x 3/8 inch,). The frog is an egyptian symbol for new life, that is why it was a very popular symbol and amulet. 

Egyptian, New Kingdom, 18th dynasty, reign of Amenhotep III, 1390 - 1352 BC. 

Source: Metropolitan Museum

You cannot know how much I want to eat this.

apatosaurus:

sesamestreet:

Nooooooooooony noony noony noony noon noon noon! *Squeak*

Coincidental with my last post.

apatosaurus:

sesamestreet:

Nooooooooooony noony noony noony noon noon noon! *Squeak*

Coincidental with my last post.

The Muslim saint Gazi Pir, riding a Bengal tiger and carrying a poisonous snake, having tamed the pair of them.

The Muslim saint Gazi Pir, riding a Bengal tiger and carrying a poisonous snake, having tamed the pair of them.